Industry 4.0 at Bosch

Integrated production networks, tablets, and smartphones on the production line are all symbols of a massive shift taking place in industry and far beyond. This shift is part of Industry 4.0, the fourth phase of industrialization.

Phase 1 involved mechanization (steam engines and their successors). Phase 2 was about the electrification of production (with electricity supplanting steam as the source of power). And phase 3 started roughly in the 1970s with the launch of the first computers. It was not until Industry 4.0, however, that people could connect with digitally controlled machines over the Internet across national borders.

The Innovation Cluster Connected Industry at Bosch identified seven basic features with the aim of achieving greater transparency. They represent integrated value-creation production networks and apply to systems and equipment, software  and the solutions offered. Furthermore, they serve as the guiding principles for Bosch when developing Industry 4.0 products.

We will now be presenting these with matching symbols and an illustration containing scenes that describe how they work.

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Distributed intelligence

Distributed intelligence

A scanner allows the robot to identify objects on its own – that is, without a central server – which of the available caps is the right one for a particular bottle. This and autonomous transporters are two examples of smart Industry 4.0 modules. Distributed intelligence Facilitates the self-optimization of production.

People as key players

People as key players

People are key players in Industry 4.0. They control the entire system and make decisions while receiving comprehensive support from digital systems. Industry 4.0 also means less physical strain and stress. Workstations are designed to adapt to the ergonomic needs of associates, and strenuous, unpleasant routine work is done away with.

Secure value-creation network

Secure value-creation network

Protecting data and preventing unauthorized access to this information are both of critical importance as collaboration and production increasingly take place with partners outside of the company. Needless to say, ensuring that the technicians operating digitally controlled machines are protected is also part of efforts to ensure employee safety.

Digital life-cycle management

Digital life-cycle management

A key part on a tractor-trailer is showing signs of fatigue. A company performing service spots this, and developers begin their work to rectify the defect on the product. Having processes, tools, and product data networked will speed up development and result in better products. The end to end life cycle of machines, or even of entire value streams, can be analyzed and improved by using the data.

Virtual real-time representation

Virtual real-time representation

A virtual representation of a truck and the load it is hauling is available while the vehicle is out on the road. This is shown on monitors, and thanks to the data being transmitted, every action or event involving the truck, its load, or the products is immediately recorded. The virtual components can then be used, for example, to track where and when they were installed. This saves a lot of work when it proves necessary to replace specific defective or broken parts.

Open standards

Open standards

Simply connect: Open standards, compatible platforms, and standardized interfaces, protocols, and connectors make it possible for two different machines or systems to work together – both within one plant and beyond. This leads to expanded value-creation networks that also include partners outside of the company. Modules from different manufacturers will be able to work together in the future thanks to the use of open standards.

Distributed intelligence

Fast integration and flexible configuration

A new machine is installed on the production line. Because it is networked, and thanks to ultrafast data transmission speeds, production can immediately resume. Plug and produce is what the process just described is called. With this, there is no need to make specific changes to the programming when integrating the new machine. In addition, flexible configuration means that a simple change to the software is all that is required to launch new versions of products, resulting in more flexibility.

Fast integration and flexible configuration
Distributed intelligence
People as key players
Secure value-creation network
Digital life-cycle management
Virtual real-time representation
Open standards
Fast Integration & Flexible Configuration
Fast Integration & Flexible Configuration
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Open standards
Open standards
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Distributed intelligence
Distributed intelligence
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People as key players
People as key players
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Secure value-creation network
Secure value-creation network
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Digital life-cycle management
Digital life-cycle management
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Virtual real-time representation
Virtual real-time representation
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Future production with Industry 4.0

A message from Steven Young, President of Bosch Turkey and Middle East

As Bosch, we are one of the companies experiencing Industry 4.0, the fourth industrial revolution, and launching pioneering works in this transformation. We have already established the first components of Industry 4.0 in our operations. At this point, we see ourselves both as a leading user and a leading provider in this field.

The global Internet of Things (IoT) market is expected to be approximately 250 billion dollars as of 2020.

As Bosch, we are focusing on offering smart solutions and services acting as assistants and partners. We have a significant potential and a strong position to use this potential. We are operating in several fields from mobility solutions and industrial technology to energy and building technologies and consumer products. And we are capable of connecting all these fields to each other.

One of our priority targets is sharing our experience in this field with all of our business partners in Turkey… In today’s production industry, ensuring automation in all work flows, collecting data at every stage, and analyzing such collected data and using them for increasing the efficiency is the method for protecting the competitiveness for a long time. At this point, companies should make their investments by seeing the big picture. They should prepare a transformation roadmap based on the company’s vision, and implement integrated solutions. As Bosch, we are ready to share our experience with the Turkish industry and serve to our industry in this regard.